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The top 10 questions to ask your logo client

The top ten questions to ask your logo client

The most critical step in the logo design process is gathering input from the client. it is one of the most difficult. Indeed, it is frequently more difficult than conceptualization itself.

We’ve created hundreds of logos over the years and may have worked with a variety of clients. Typically, we work with clients who take branding seriously and would have considered how their logo should look prior to contacting a company like ours. However, we occasionally encounter clients who view the logo design process as a black box, and there are several logo design myths to debunk.

Typically, these clients have no input into the designer’s style or substance. They hope that by providing the company name and the nature of the business, the logo designer will be able to create an eye-catching, impactful, cutting-edge, modern, and memorable logo (in short a great logo design).

As a result, it is critical for you as a logo designer to solicit as much input from the client as possible. I’ve compiled a list of the top ten questions to ask a client. Additionally, you should explain how you work and the process so that the client’s expectations are clear. Kindly leave a comment below if you have any additional questions that you believe should not be overlooked.

1. WHAT IS THE BUSINESS, SERVICE, OR PRODUCT’S NATURE?

This is a more standard question that all designers should be aware of, but I included it for completeness’ sake.

2. WHAT IS THE LOGO’S EXACT TEXT?

It is critical that you establish precisely what the client wishes to see in the logo. You’ll need to explain to the client that wording changes may have an effect on the concepts, and thus the client must agree on the exact words in the logo before any design work begins.

3. DO YOU HAVE A SLOGAN OR TAGLINE?

Additionally, it is critical to ascertain whether the client desires a slogan or tag line in the logo, as well as the degree of integration desired. Certain clients prefer to see the tag line as a distinct entity that is placed beneath the actual logo design. Others may prefer to incorporate the tag into the design itself.

4. WHO IS THE MARKET POPULATION?

This is critical information that will assist the logo designer in determining who will most likely see the logo. This then assists the designer in attempting to imagine the type of message that might be appropriate for that target audience.

For instance, if you have two businesses called “Black Hawks Construction,” one catering to the residential market and the other to the commercial market, your two logos must be quite different in terms of color scheme, font selection, iconography, and layout. A corporate-looking logo with an iconic representation of a hawk may be appropriate for the commercial market, whereas a more approachable version with an icon representing a house or a tree, or even line art of a construction worker or structure, may be more appropriate for the domestic market.

5. ARE THERE ANY COMPETITORS?

It is beneficial to ascertain who the client believes to be their direct competitors. Naturally, a logo designer would also need to conduct their own research by examining as many corporate identities as possible in the same market in order to determine current trends.

6. DO YOU HAVE ANY CREATIVE STRATEGIES?

This is the difficult part. Many clients may not have considered their logo at all and thus would be unable to communicate their requirements to the designer. They frequently shrug their shoulders and declare, “I am not a designer!

Acceptable. However, we frequently observe that after presenting a few concepts to the same client, they return claiming to have expected something else. It is preferable to ascertain what that “something else” is in advance. You should explain to the client that it would be extremely beneficial to understand the client’s preferred look and feel or logo style. Alternatively, they could inform the designer of the type of image or icon they believe would look good. This brings us to the following point.

7. ARE THERE ANY EXAMPLES OF LOGOS THAT THE CLIENT APPRECIATES?

Following up on the previous point, it would be extremely beneficial to learn which logos your client prefers. This could be from your portfolio or from the public domain. Invite the client to spend some time browsing the web and submitting a list of logos they like. This assists the designer in determining the client’s preferred style.

There are numerous logo styles available. There are simple iconic logos, illustrative logos, text-based logos, line art logos, three-dimensional logos, and web 2.0 logos.

8. ARE THERE ANY EXAMPLES OF LOGOS THAT THE CLIENT DISLIKES?

Knowing what the client dislikes enables you to avoid working on styles that will ultimately be rejected by the client. However, the logo designer must exercise judgment and not be afraid to present a concept that incorporates an icon or image that the client has stated they dislike. Perhaps with the proper treatment, the designer can demonstrate a new angle or perspective to the client and assist them in comprehending how that particular image or icon can actually benefit the brand.

9. WHICH COLORS ARE PREFERRED?

Additionally, it is critical that the client has some idea of the colors they wish to see in the logo concepts. While the client may not understand the significance of the various colors in terms of how people or consumers may react or behave toward them, it would be beneficial if they indicated a preference for a few colors.

10. WHERE WILL THE LOGO BE USED THE MOST?

Additionally, it is critical to ascertain where the client will most likely use their logo. The medium of communication aids in making decisions about gradient usage, layout definition, and more.

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